Sign in with Facebook
  • Facebook Page: 128172154133
  • Twitter: EarthProtect1

Posted by on in Climate Change
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 180
  • 1 Comment

Yale study on how people in US think and talk about Climate Change

Jan 1, 2014

http://climatecommunication.yale.edu/visualizations-data/ycom-us-2016/ Climate Opinion Maps 

 The “Yale Climate Opinion Maps” (YCOM) allow users to visualize and explore differences in public opinion about global warming in the United States in unprecedented geographic detail, as the map of public worry about global warming illustrates.  58% of Americans are worried about global warming. But this national number glosses over the enormous geographic diversity in public opinion across the country – diversity that is revealed for the first time in these maps.

 We undertook this project because most of the action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prepare for climate impacts is happening at the state and local levels of American society. Yet elected officials, the media, advocates, and educators currently know little about public climate change opinion at these sub-national levels. State and local surveys are costly and time intensive, and as a result most public opinion polling is only done at the national level. The estimates from our model provide a new way to understand and visualize the geographic diversity in public opinion across the country; something that is not feasible using standard survey techniquesEstimated % of adults who think global warming is happening, 2016

Public Opinion Estimates, United States, 2016

BELIEFS

Global warming is happening

Natural changes

32%

Human activities

53%

Global warming is caused mostly by human activities

There is a lot of disagreement

28%

Yes

49%

Most scientists think global warming is happening

Somewhat/Strongly distrust

26%

Somewhat/Strongly trust

71%

Trust climate scientists about global warming

RISK PERCEPTIONS

50%

Not Worried

42%

Worried

58%

Worried about global warming

25+ years/Never

49%

Now/Within 10 years

51%

Global warming is already harming people in the US

Little/Not at all

50%

Great/Moderate Amount

40%

Global warming will harm me personally

Little/Not at all

33%

Great/Moderate Amount

58%

Global warming will harm people in the US

Little/Not at all

25%

Great/Moderate Amount

63%

Global warming will harm people in developing countries

Little/Not at all

19%

Great/Moderate Amount

70%

Global warming will harm future generations

Little/Not at all

21%

Great/Moderate amount

69%

Global warming will harm plants and animals

POLICY SUPPORT

50%

Oppose

17%

Support

82%

Fund research into renewable energy sources

Oppose

24%

Support

75%

Regulate CO2 as a pollutant

Oppose

29%

Support

69%

Set strict CO2 limits on existing coal-fired power plants

Oppose

33%

Support

66%

Require utilities to produce 20% electricity from renewable sources

BEHAVIORS

50%

Never

31%

At least occasionally

33%

Discuss global warming at least occasionally

Once a month or less often

76%

At least weekly

24%

Hear about global warming in the media at least once a week

About the Data

 

Public opinion estimates are produced using a statistical model based on national survey data gathered between 2008 and 2016 by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication. The Global Warming’s Six Americas segments are determined using 36 survey items that include questions about climate change beliefs, risk perceptions, behaviors, and policy support. “Metro” areas include both metropolitan and micropolitan areas as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. For details see methods and Howe, P., Mildenberger, M., Marlon, J.R., and Leiserowitz, A., “Geographic variation in opinions on climate change at state and local scales in the USA,” Nature Climate Change. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2583. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.

 

This research and website are funded by the Skoll Global Threats Fund, the Energy Foundation, the 11th Hour Project, the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment, and the MacArthur Foundation.

 

Data mapping tool developed by Joshuah Latimore.

 

Comments

  • GreenDog
    GreenDog Thursday, 20 April 2017

    Yale Study

    blog has link to the interactive graphic in which you can put in your own areas of interest iike Boise, Iowa or San Diego, CA

  • Please login first in order for you to submit comments

81595f2dd9db45846609c618f993af1c

© Earth Protect