Sign in with Facebook
  • Facebook Page: 128172154133
  • Twitter: EarthProtect1

Posted by on in Wildlife Conservation
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 1549
  • 0 Comments

Gorilla Conservation Tracked for 5000 Days

Fifteen years ago, ranger-based monitoring (or RBM for short) was initiated as a tool in the conservation of mountain gorillas. Whether patrolling the park for law enforcement or tracking mountain gorillas for health assessments or to facilitate visits by tourists or researchers, data is being collected and recorded on data sheets. Every day. That’s over 5,000 days of valuable data collected.

While RBM data is analyzed regularly to inform decisions related to park management, the 15 year anniversary of its initiation provided an opportunity to look at trends in the data collected over this time period.

At the end of June 2012, IGCP’s species conservation duo – Dr. Augustin Basabose and Mr. Charles Kayijamahe – convened a workshop bringing together park staff, researchers and conservationists from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda.

Park-specific results were presented and discussed at the workshop. Keep in mind that mountain gorillas are found in four national parks and one nature reserve in the three countries. Collectively, these protected areas form two distinct forest blocks – the Virunga Massif and Bwindi.

 

The data collected for the last fifteen years were collectively discussed and trends were identified. Above are the collective home ranges for habituated mountain gorilla groups in the Virunga Massif and Bwindi. It was noted for most, but not all, habituated mountain gorilla groups in both the Virunga Massif and Bwindi, the home ranges have significantly expanded over time.

 

Trends over time for mountain gorillas leaving the parks to crop raid in neighboring fields were also looked at as a topic of interest among workshop participants. Ways to improve RBM data collection to capture valuable information for this potentially conflict-inducing behavior were identified by workshop participants.

 

Data, after all, are only as good as the context it was collected in and so many factors can affect the observations recorded. For example, in order to locate an illegal activity, a patrol has to be conducted in order to discover it. It was therefore important for workshop participants to add their knowledge of the situation to the maps and analysis that was done with data alone. This was the case when it came time to analyze the data on illegal activities within the two forest blocks.

The data collected for the last fifteen years were collectively discussed and trends were identified. Above are the collective home ranges for habituated mountain gorilla groups in the Virunga Massif and Bwindi. It was noted for most, but not all, habituated mountain gorilla groups in both the Virunga Massif and Bwindi, the home ranges have significantly expanded over time.
Trends over time for mountain gorillas leaving the parks to crop raid in neighboring fields were also looked at as a topic of interest among workshop participants. Ways to improve RBM data collection to capture valuable information for this potentially conflict-inducing behavior were identified by workshop participants.
Data, after all, are only as good as the context it was collected in and so many factors can affect the observations recorded. For example, in order to locate an illegal activity, a patrol has to be conducted in order to discover it. It was therefore important for workshop participants to add their knowledge of the situation to the maps and analysis that was done with data alone. This was the case when it came time to analyze the data on illegal activities within the two forest blocks.

 

 

0

Comments

81595f2dd9db45846609c618f993af1c

© Earth Protect